Service learning experience

As defined by Robert Sigmon,

Service learning experience

Reciprocal Lifelong 1 Integrative: The service-learning experience goes beyond traditional ideas of classroom learning, practicum training or off-campus volunteering. Service-learning holistically integrates class learning objectives, faculty guidance, as well as community perspective and priorities.

When engaged in genuine service students participate as both learners and community members. Students demonstrate success both academically and interpersonally. Structured opportunities for reflection can enable learners to examine and form the beliefs, values, opinions, assumptions, judgments and practices related to an action or experience, gain a deeper understanding of them and construct their own meaning and significance for future actions.

Service-learning provides students a unique opportunity to access knowledge and expertise that resides in the context of community. There is opportunity to connect the knowledge of a discipline, as explored in class, to the knowledge in practice, as evidenced in communities.

Learning experiences in community settings immerse students in the unpredictable and complex nature of real world situations.

Working alongside community members and experienced professionals, the opportunity to construct learning and responses can be immediate and uncontrived. Service-learning draws upon existing community strengths and resources, and honors community members and organizations as co-educators of students.

Communities are never built from the outside in.

Service learning experience

A strength-based approach focuses on the capacity and expertise that exist in every community, rather than on what is absent. The service-learning relationship offers all parties involved some measure of benefits; it is a two way street. Students give time, talent and intellectual capital in order to gain deeper understanding of course material and the nuanced nature of social issues.

Service learning experience

Course instructors modify their teaching practice to include service-learning and are rewarded with deeper student engagement of course material.

Community members and organizations invest time as co-educators and in turn accomplish more toward their mission and goals through the work of students.

Service Learning Experience - Holy Cross College

Service-learning is learning that sticks. By synthesizing theory and practice, this educational method provides a distinctive, meaningful and influential life experience. Students build relationships, solve problems, value a sense of community and gain self-awareness.Connected reflection: Link the "service" in the community with the structured "learning" in the classroom.

Without structured reflection, students may fail to bridge the gap between the concrete service experience and the abstract issues discussed in class. In the words of the National Service Learning Clearinghouse, it is “a teaching and learning strategy that integrates meaningful community service with instruction and reflection to enrich the learning experience, teach civic responsibility, and strengthen communities.” Or, to quote Vanderbilt University’s Janet S.

Eyler (winner of the. DAILY UPDATES FROM PUERTO RICO. Fourteen student-athletes are spending nearly a week (Aug. ) in Puerto Rico for a service-learning experience coordinated by the OSU Department of Athletics, SASSO, Buckeyes Go International and Soles4Souls.

Benefits of Service-Learning Service-learning has potential benefits to everyone involved: students, faculty, and the community. STUDENTS in service-learning classes can benefit academically, professionally, and personally. These are just a few of the ways: .

The Service Learning Experience can perhaps even contribute to their choice of career or field of study. Vocation has been described as the place where “my passion, my gifts meet the world’s need.” Service learning is a great way to discover both!

Connected reflection: Link the "service" in the community with the structured "learning" in the classroom. Without structured reflection, students may fail to bridge the gap between the concrete service experience and the abstract issues discussed in class.

Service Learning - Eberly Center - Carnegie Mellon University