Elizabeth cady stanton declaration of sentiments and resolutions rhetorical essay

The Declaration of Sentiments, offered for the acceptance of the Convention, was then read by E. A proposition was made to have it re-read by paragraph, and after much consideration, some changes were suggested and adopted.

Elizabeth cady stanton declaration of sentiments and resolutions rhetorical essay

Elizabeth cady stanton declaration of sentiments and resolutions rhetorical essay

Sunday, January 20, Text Analysis: This inspired many women to challenge the barriers that limited their opportunities, because for the first time in history, they are not afraid to speak up. Having achieved Independence from Great Britain did not warrant equality for everyone especially woman and blacks.

On the first paragraph, Stanton angrily states that they should be given rights because they are all created equal. God did not create one person to rule over another person; may it be woman, man or black.

Testimonials:

Stanton does not distant herself from the blacks and slaves; she sees herself as one of them. Stanton believes that everyone has inalienable rights: Government is built to protect these rights, and when they fail, the oppressed must stand up.

Stanton gives a reason why there is Declaration of Sentiments. She feels that the government has failed to give the inalienable rights so she led three hundred reformers to undo the wrong that is done.

Stanton feels that the government is despotize by men and men alone, and that women have no voice, no opinion, and no worth. Women feel like they are slaves, and owned because they have no freedom.

Declaration of Sentiments and Resolutions, Seneca Falls: Stanton and Anthony Papers Online

Stanton lists her Sentiments just like the Declaration of Independence in hopes that women can be freed and gain independence from men; just like how the thirteen colonies were free from the rule of Great Britain.

She goes on listing all the things that are immorally wrong and she pleads to the people and government that they need to have equal rights and privileges which their human rights.

The historical significant of this document is that this is the very first time that women gathered to organized a revolution for their independence. Despite of the criticism that women received, because of this document women were making strides for their independence. The struggle to gain independence and to be equal with men is now a formal, official, organized movement.

Another meeting was held after Seneca Falls Convention which had a larger audience. This document is a catalyst in starting the fight for independence for women. It is morally wrong to oppress, belittle, and strip women with their rights.

People are all created equal and we all have equal rights.Rhiannon Horn. Period 1/Skaff. AP Lang and Comp. 11/3/ Comparison. Declaration of Sentiments vs.

Declaration of Independence. The United States freedom has been paved by the founding fathers when they wrote the Declaration of Independence, but even after America’s thoughts were compiled together and written, freedom was not freely given to all citizens.5/5(1).

Jul 13,  · July 13th, A Rhetorical Analysis: Declaration of Sentiments and Resolutions by Elizabeth Cady Stanton In the declaration of sentiments and resolutions speech Words: — Pages: 5. Two hundred years later, women were facing the same injustice, only it was from men; and to protest against the unfair treatment, Elizabeth Cady Stanton wrote the Declaration of Sentiments and Resolutions.

Transcript of Declaration of Sentiments and Resolutions,Seneca Falls:Rhetorical Analysis Outline by Raven Collins Declaration of Sentiments and Resolution, Seneca Falls: Rhetorical Analysis Outline Published March 23, The Declaration of Sentiments and Resolutions, Seneca Falls was written by Elizabeth Cady Stanton.

The “Declaration of Sentiments and Resolutions” by Elizabeth Cady Stanton was proclaimed in a small town of Seneca Falls on July , This text was a turn-point for the suffragist movement.

- Robert Keith Miller's Discrimination is a Virtue, Elizabeth Cady Stanton's Declaration of Sentiments and Resolutions, and Eva Hoffman's Wanderers by Choice Robert Keith Miller wrote Discrimination is a Virtue to clarify the definition of discrimination and how it is suppose to be used.

Declaration of Sentiments and Resolutions, Seneca Falls: Stanton and Anthony Papers Online